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Oil rig jobs in North Dakota

Oil rig jobs in North Dakota are plentiful. Here goes a brief list of vacancies by oil drilling contractors and associated companies that has been updated recently, and that we recommend you to check out:

  • Hot Oil Truck Operator - MBI Energy (job in Lignite, Dickinson, ND)
  • Truck Driver - MBI Energy ( this oil rig job requires travelling and visiting Beulah, Minot, Watford City, Belfield, Ross, ND)
  • Directional Driller - Rocky Mountain Region
  • Safety Administrator Overnights - MBI Energy (job in Dickinson, ND)
  • Diesel Mechanic and Truck Driver - Nuverra, ND
  • Truck Driver and Mechanic - Nuverra(Various Cities, ND)
  • Health and Safety Specialist (HSE) - MBI Energy (Belfield, ND)
  • Winch Truck Operator - MBI Energy (3 cities, ND)
  • Mechanic - MBI Energy (employment in Williston, ND. Contract duration - 12 months. Extension possible)
  • Tool Pusher - MBI Energy (Watford City, ND)
  • Project Manager - MBI Energy
  • Project Manager (oil drilling job in Belfield, ND)
  • Workover Rig Mechanic Welder - MBI Energy (Watford, ND)
  • Workover Rig Operator - MBI Energy (oil rig job in Watford City, ND)
  • Well Intervention Receptionist - MBI Energy(Watford, City)
  • Crude Oil Drivers - Baca Energy (Greeley, Co)
  • Oil Tool Technician - location: Minot, ND
  • Drug and Alcohol Coordinator - MBI Energy (Watford City, ND)
  • Flatbed Driver - Midwest Crane Services (company office in Belfield, ND)
  • EDI Specialist - MBI Energy (job in Bismarck, ND)
  • Workover Rig Derrick Hand - MBI Energy (oil rig job in Watford City, ND)
  • Oil rig Mechanic - MBI Energy (oil rig job in Williston, ND)
  • Workover Rig Floorhand - MBI Energy (oilfield job in Watford City, ND)
  • SWD Technican 2 - MBI Energy (oil rig position Watford City, ND)
  • Flatbed Drivers - SBG Energy
North Dakota Oilfield Employment and ND Oil Boom

Commercial reserves of the crude oil in North Dakota were discovered back in 1951. Nevertheless, since then oilfield development and oil production in the state of North Dakota was for long time considered unprofitable because of the depth, exceeding 13,000' to drill through to reach the oil reservoir and penetrate inside. Hard job to do, wasn't it? But when the average price for the crude oil reached $US 80 per barrel, the oil extraction became cost-effective, immediately turning ND residents wealthy.

Here are some facts and figures. Recoverable natural oil deposits in North Dakota are estimated at 1.5 billion tonnes. In 2012 the total oil production in the state constituted approximately 30 million tonnes. If oil rigs continue the production with the current rate, it's going to take 50 years until the deposits get exhausted. It's not only oil drilling companies, but also catering, transportation, logistics, research etc. contractors that rushed to the state. During the last 5 years the unemployment level in North Dakota fell down from 9% to 2.3% (the national average being 8.2% of the active workforce). Median per capita income in the state in 2012 made $US 52.000, reaching the level for the richest US states New York and California. Once poor families, possessing oil patches in North Dakota became started receiving $US 60.000-80.000 worth rent a month. The time turned out good also for people who did not have oil land: 18-20-year-old young people can count to get a job of laborer (Roustabout) on oil rig and receive 80-90K annual salary per year. This can be compared to salaries, earned on offshore platforms (sea based oil rigs). Working conditions on oilfields of North Dakota are demanding, you have to work 14 hours a day in shifts, but there's hardly an employee or worker on ND oil rigs feeling likely to complain.

Oil boom in North Dakota impacted even non-related industries, the salaries went up.

Big salaries on ND oilfields gradually affected the salaries in other industries. So much so that one of the most greedy supermarkets in America, the Wallmart, couldn't fail to set the minimum hourly rate in North Dakota for its workers at $US 12 per hour (compared to the average $US 7.25 hourly rate across the continental USA). The Wallmart's management reasonably figured out that was the best and the cheapest way to avoid workforce leakage to the oil drilling industry, so badly needing low-skilled workers and offering employment to every healthy guy or female on ND oil rigs. Who would agree to roach for a penny as a salesperson in a supermarket under such circumstances? Oil drilling boom continues, attracting flock of willing oil rig job seekers to places in ND like town of Williston, so there's a real problem for other local industries to follow tendencies in order to retain their existing employees and workers from leaving for the oilfields, the more so that oil drilling contractors hire never paying much attention to the availability of previous experience - they believe the time is money, and it is much cheaper to have the workers trained as they go, there are apprenticeship schemes. Employment offers to fill oilfield job openings come from about 20 landbased oil rigs, scattered across the state.

More jobs with oil fracking companies in Western ND are coming

Improvements in technologies that brought to life hydraulic fracturing pushed Western North Dakota to prosperity, based on oil, and the production keeps increasing, setting new records and creating even more new oil rig jobs, as well as producing favorable effect upon North Dakota's economy, making it one of the fastest growing both in the United States and in the world. Within the terms of facts and figures, the ND oil boom during the several recent years was directly responsible for creating nearly 80,000 new jobs locally. The state also experienced influx of the workers, hoping to earn big salaries in oil industry in low end positions on oil fields that require none or very little previous experience (jobs of Roustabout, Roughneck, Truck Drivers, all sorts of Helpers etc). Median salary for oilfield workers in North Dakota was reported at $US 112,500 per annum back with salaries for entry-level oilfield jobs averaging a little more than $US 65,000 a year. This information was taken from open public sources.

Environmental Concerns

Low prices on crude oil push the oil drilling companies around the world to look for ways to reduce, wherever possible, the non-productive expenses that oil production process involves. In North Dakota, USA, the fracking companies, engaged in the extraction of shale energy, try to lobby some changes to the existing legislation in order to ensure that the production waste could be reset to the local landfill. Saving potential of the amendment of the kind is estimated around $US 100 million a year. However, local residents are concerned that the radioactive waste could be disposed at too close distance from their homes.





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